About Us

A little bit about the Livingstonia Hospital Partnership

The Livingstonia Hospital Partnership is a group of people trying to provide financial, practical and prayerful support for the David Gordon Memorial Hospital in Livingstonia, Malawi.

The hospital is located in the small mission town of Livingstonia in northern Malawi, set on a high plateau overlooking Lake Malawi.  The area is very remote, with limited communication services and poor road access.

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Some Background Information on The Hospital

The David Gordon Memorial Hospital is a Church run hospital (Church of Central African Presbyterian), which serves an extremely poor rural population of 60,000 people through the hospital in Livingstonia and 4 health Centres along Lake Malawi. It provides both curative and preventative health services to people living in an area of approximately 1,300 square kilometres, and aims to improve the health of the population through both healthcare provision and improvements to the local environment, by providing basic essentials such as clean water and food security.

The Hospital was initially built by a donation of funds in memory of David Gordon, by his two Scottish sisters and was part of the Mission started by the Church of Scotland. It was completed in 1910. The hospital was handed over to the Church of Central Africa Presbyterian in the 1980’s.

The Hospital Moto is:

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Conditions in Malawi

The small central African country of Malawi is known for its friendly people, stunning beauty, and tremendous poverty.  Average per capita income in Malawi is below $200 per year, and Malawi consistently ranks among the world’s ten poorest countries.

Particularly in rural areas, basic services such as schools, electricity, clean water, and passable roads are unavailable to many families.  Shortage of farmland and lack of money to purchase food lead to chronic malnutrition in Malawi, and like many other sub-Saharan African countries, Malawi is also facing an HIV/AIDS crisis, compounded by high prevalence of other deadly diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis.  Average life expectancy in Malawi is only 37 years, among the lowest in the world.

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Conditions close to the Hospital

As in the rest of Malawi, malaria remains the highest killer of both children and adults in the hospital catchment area.  Maternal mortality is very high, with one mother in every 120 dying during childbirth.  Though lower than the national average of 15%, the HIV prevalence rate of 11% is still extremely high.

Opportunities for formal employment are extremely limited, with most families relying on small-scale agricultural production to meet their food needs.

Most people have no regular monetary income and exist on less than 16 pence per day. The hospital provides essential services to them.

Although the hospital is owned and run by the Church of Central Africa Presbyterian the Church members are unable to provide the funds necessary to run the hospital and the local community cannot pay the real costs of their care. The Livingstonia Hospital Partnership aims to benefit the local poor community by helping the hospital to continue to function and provide good care by supporting them financially, with equipment and training.

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The hospital has 136 beds but often caters for more patients who lie on the floor and their relatives who come to give them basic care often also must sleep on the floor or on the veranda. There are 4 main wards, male and female wards, maternity and the Caroline Long Children’s ward. There are two theatres and a laboratory.

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Livingstonia Hospital Partnership exists to work alongside our Malawian colleagues providing support, expertise and training where possible to enable that vision to be fulfilled. If you would also like to be involved please join us as a member of the Partnership and provide support as you are able. We wish to encourage people to consider giving regularly – and to gift aid any donation if you are a UK taxpayer.

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